Earlier this year, around 800 women allegedly sought legal action against botched vaginal mesh implants which left them unable to walk or have sex without being in severe pain.

Earlier this year, around 800 women allegedly sought legal action against botched vaginal mesh implants which left them unable to walk or have sex without being in severe pain.

Thousands more were reportedly forced to have their implants removed because of complications.

A statement from MHRA said: “We have undertaken a great deal of work to continuously assess findings of studies undertaken by the clinical community over many years, as well as considering the feedback from all sources in that time.

“What we have seen, and continue to see, is that evidence supports and the greater proportion of the clinical community and patients support the use of these devices in the UK for treatment of the distressing conditions of incontinence and organ prolapse in appropriate circumstances.

“We encourage anyone who suspects they have had a complication after having a mesh device implanted to discuss this with their clinician and report to us via the Yellow Card scheme regardless of how long ago the implant was inserted.”

Call for ban

Draft guidelines from health watchdog Nice say the implants should not be used for routine operations.

They can cut into the vagina and women have described constant and horrific pain, leaving them unable to walk, work or have sex.

Now, Nice are expected to recommend they are only used for research and not routine surgery, the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire show revealed.

The official guidance is due to be published next month.

One expert said he expects the NHS will take up those guidelines, after top doctors warned the vaginal mesh scandal is “bigger than Thalidomide”

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